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Making the Most of Barcodes, QR Codes, and NFC

The origins of barcode scanning in business For most, the word “barcode” conjures up images of stocked grocery aisles and packages marked with the now-ubiquitous Universal Product Code (UPC). While we’re all familiar with the the black vertical lines that make up a barcode, most of us take this simple invention for granted — not realizing the extent to which it’s revolutionized how businesses operate. Invented in the 1950s, barcode scanning was inspired by a Philadelphia grocery store’s desire to automatically record product information during checkout, a manual process up to that point. During the 1970s, with the introduction of the UPC, barcodes started appearing on the packages and store shelf labeling for most household goods. Over the last five decades, barcode scanning has revolutionized industries — improving overall efficiency, speeding up inventory management, automating tasks, and reducing opportunities for human error. While the one-dimensional barcode continues to be reliable and effective, its success inspired the development and adoption of more modern scanning systems like Quick Response (QR) codes and Near-field Communication (NFC), which help businesses streamline their processes even further. Let’s take a look at the role these systems play today in the manufacturing, utilities, and construction industries. “Lean manufacturing” with barcode scanning Many areas of manufacturing can be rife with inefficiencies, with excess labor and overly complex processes leading to bloated costs and reduced productivity. But barcode scanning has helped companies of all sizes pursue “lean manufacturing” — a way of doing more with less that was first popularized by Toyota in the 1930s. While adopting lean systems can be expensive (in terms of both cost and time), barcode scanning continues to be a simple, proven and cost-effective method for streamlining and automating myriad manufacturing and distribution processes. In manufacturing, barcodes are used for a variety of mission-critical tasks, including: Getting real-time tracking alerts and inventory status on parts and goods Quickly locating stock across multiple locations without having to roam warehouses Processing and managing orders with accuracy Replacing manual inventory-taking and data entry methods Eco-friendly QR code practices for utilities The success of the barcode led to the development of QR codes in the 1990s. Unlike one-dimensional barcodes, QR codes are coded in two directions (across and up/down), which means they can hold much more information, including text, URLs, images, videos, and documents. Because of their flexibility and storage, utility companies have been using them to not only improve the customer experience, but also to implement sustainable and eco-friendly business practices. For instance, in 2015, the United Kingdom’s Department of Energy and Climate Change introduced QR codes on residents’ energy bills. With a single QR code, each resident was able to perform all of the following by simply scanning the code with their smartphone: Monitor their gas and electricity consumption Review comparison charts of energy costs across different suppliers Easily switch suppliers to save money Utility companies in other regions have adopted similar practices, as well as using QR codes to replace paper documents that require mailing to provide a quick and easy way for customers to access billing and other information without having to print it or request hard copies. NFC on construction job sites NFC — a short-range wireless communication technology that became its own standard in 2003 — is also helping companies improve efficiency, especially in the field. Rooted in RFID (radio-frequency identification technology), NFC allows two-way communication between two electronic devices when they’re within 4 cm of each other. It enables familiar consumer experiences like contactless mobile payment systems and content-sharing on social media, as well as pushing offers and incentives to retail customers’ smartphones as they enter or move through a store. NFC has also been widely adopted to help companies with workforce, equipment and inventory identification, authentication, and tracking. In the construction industry, NFC tags and readers are used on busy job sites to streamline day-to-day operations. For instance, NFC readers are strategically placed around sites to automatically track workers’ arrival times and whereabouts across specific locations. Some companies even place NFC tags on hardhats to quickly access workers’ safety accreditations and to accurately track people during sudden site evacuations. Construction sites are also using NFC tags and readers to track and manage on-site equipment, including tracking materials and sections of large structures as they arrive on site. Choosing the right solution for your business Barcodes, QR codes, and NFC all have their individual advantages, and one shouldn’t be viewed as a replacement for another. Instead, all three are effective for streamlining processes, automating work, and reducing opportunities for human error — it’s just a matter of using them smartly, in ways that optimize for each of their strengths. And while their results can transform your business in powerful ways, they’re still quite affordable and easy to implement. So why not experiment with all three?

The Stages of Digital Transformation for Construction Companies

There are many ways construction companies can approach digital transformation with each approach carrying specific advantages.Ultimately, construction companies should be looking to weave multiple technologies together in order to create well-rounded digital transformation strategy that encompasses connectivity, software, connected endpoints, big data, and analytics. So where do you start? First, consider where your company sits in terms of digital transformation progress. Forrester breaks down digital transformation into three tiers: 47 percent of organizations are classified as beginners, using rudimentary digital strategies that transform experiences. 39 percent of companies are in an intermediate state of digital transformation, with strategies in place that can transform business operations. 14 percent of companies have achieved an advanced state of digital transformation, where it’s possible to transform markets. Here’s a breakdown of some of the benefits that a construction company can achieve through digital transformation in the context of Forrester’s three tiers: Beginner Construction companies with loosely-defined or uncoordinated digital transformation strategies can be classified as beginners. Benefits at this stage may include enhanced communication (e.g., using apps or real-time communications platforms), enhanced productivity, improved data entry, and possibly some cost reductions. At this level, business processes and employee experiences are improved. Intermediate At the intermediate level, digital transformation is tied together and executed strategically across the organization. At this stage, benefits extend beyond just the user experience. Companies tend to operate as cohesive digital units driven by mobile apps, connected devices, and analytics. At the intermediate level, however, benefits do not extend beyond the walls of the company. A company can’t expect to drive industry-wide change with an intermediate digital transformation strategy.   Advanced The highest level a company can attain is an advanced state of digital transformation. Here, the organization is fully digitalized and capable of driving change across an entire supply chain, making use of Internet of Things (IoT) sensors, sharing apps and services with vendors, and using predictive analytics to make decisions and plan project outcomes. At this stage, companies typically avoid making hasty digital deployments. Instead, they roll out so-called “lighthouse” projects, which are small projects designed to study how digital processes may impact teams or divisions. Companies at the advanced level tend to be much more methodical about how they go about digital transformation. One step at a time Digitalizing your construction business is becoming a vital process because of how the industry is evolving, but that doesn't mean you have to drop yourself in the deep end immediately. The great thing about digital transformation is that you can do it at your pace, one step at a time.

The Digital Approach to Construction Management

Compared to other sectors, the construction industry has been slow to adopt digital transformation. Many companies fail to move beyond pilot projects and capture the true benefits that next-generation technologies have to offer.  However, there is a tremendous opportunity for construction companies that can successfully digitalize their operations and move away from manual paper and spreadsheet-based workflows.  It’s important to realize that there is no single solution for digital construction management. Rather, digital construction management refers to a class of hardware and software technologies that can be used to streamline all areas of operations including scheduling, inventory, project management communication, hiring, on-boarding, and more.   Let's go over some tips that can help your company embrace digital construction management and enjoy better business outcomes because of it.  Start with a clear goal One of the top reasons digital construction projects fail is because teams lack a cohesive and value-driven plan.  “For a digital transformation to be successful, executives and managers must start with a clear definition of how digital will create value for the business,” a recent report from McKinsey says. “During the transformation, they must spend as much time, if not more, on operational change as they spend on technology. Those that do stand to realize a significant productivity payoff.” According to McKinsey, productivity gains can increase by as much as 15 percent by implementing digital transformation.  Assign a dedicated task force For the best results, assign a team of business champions to oversee digital transformation initiatives. This team should consult with individual department heads and managers to identify opportunities for improvement, experiment with digital solutions, and track progress. Simply put, creating a digital transformation task force will greatly increase your odds of success.  Use software strategically There are many off-the-shelf construction software solutions on the market. However, these programs tend to be very expensive and lack flexibility and customization options.  Instead of buying software, a growing number of construction companies are choosing to build their own proprietary applications using no-code app development platforms.  What constructions app might look like Now that you’re aware of some of the benefits that come with using apps for construction management, let’s take a look at some specific apps to give you a better idea of how you might use them. Daily reports: Create a list of items that require daily logging and track them in a centralized hub. Check out AppSheet’s sample Daily Reports app. Safety audits: Never get caught off guard during an audit. Build an app to track, manage, and share safety audit reports. Try AppSheet’s sample Safety Audits app. Manage inventory: Maintain open lines of communication between your inventory, purchasing, and field managers by using an app. See AppSheet’s Inventory Management app. For more ideas, check out some additional sample apps. Better yet, jump right in and build your own digital solutions. Get started for free.

Using Apps to Improve Incident Reporting

It can happen when you least expect it: one minute everything is fine, and then a worker goes down with a sudden injury triggering an immediate response from management.    Managers in high-risk environments like utilities, construction, oil and gas, and manufacturing need to be ready to spring into action whenever emergencies arise. And part of this job involves knowing how to produce clean, professional, and accurate incident reports.  One way to improve incident reporting is to create dedicated reporting apps that include forms and fields employees can use to easily share data.  Read on to learn about the advantages to using digital incident reporting.  Establishing a formal process  Companies run into problems when employees lack clear guidelines for creating and escalating incident reports. For example, when an accident happens, a manager may overlook an important detail and take the wrong course of action. These snafus spur unnecessary complication.   By creating a digital incident reporting app, companies create official reporting protocol that offers managers detailed step-by-step instructions. This way, when injuries happen or incidents occur, there are no guessing games.  With the right app in place, managers will know exactly what to do and when they should do it. Scheduling interviews When an incident occurs, it’s necessary to interview employees who were directly involved and have first-hand knowledge so that management can accurately assess the information on hand. Apps can help here, too.  For example, an incident reporting app could contain an embedded scheduling assistant to coordinate follow-up interviews. Managers can track who they reach out to, as well as when and why. This type of information comes in handy when dealing with union or legal representatives and third-party auditors, among others.  Compiling evidence The more data that management can collect following an incident, the better. This is very important for both administrative and legal purposes.  An app can serve as a central repository for photos, interviews, documents, and more. The app becomes an easy, convenient, and secure way to track information as it flows in during the investigation process.  Submitting reports After an incident occurs, administrators must respond in a timely manner. There’s no room for dismissing, overlooking, or misplacing reports.  Incident reports can be easily shared with all relevant parties via SMS or email. Digital signature requests can also be added to ensure issues are followed up on.  Apps also lead to more accurate reporting. Traditional reports are submitted on paper forms and then entered manually into the computer. However, hand-written reports can be difficult to read and are easily misinterpreted. By eliminating the need for transcription, apps improve accuracy while reducing the time that’s needed to close investigations.  As you can see, digital reporting apps deliver a number of benefits to organizations like yours.  To learn more about how you can create custom apps for your organization using AppSheet, check this out.

Improving Construction Safety

Construction sites can be dangerous. Construction work, by nature, is also physical work. And depending on the type of construction job, employees are often working under conditions where there's a potential to be harmed. According to the OSHA, one in every five worker deaths happens in construction. The top causes of private sector construction fatalities include electrocution, getting struck by an object, and getting caught between objects. These accidents cause 59.9 percent of construction-related deaths. Clearly, worker safety is a very serious matter for construction companies. Providing workers with the proper safety mechanisms can literally be a matter of life and death. To maintain safe working conditions, a growing number of companies are using mobile apps to streamline construction safety. Apps can act as critical liaisons between administrators, field managers, and workers, helping teams share important safety-related information in a way that is fast, convenient, and reliable. Recent advancements in no-code development have also made it possible for construction teams to design, develop, and deploy apps in a way that is easy and affordable. With that in mind, here are some of the top ways that apps can help improve construction safety. Communicating with teams Construction workers are often dispersed across large physical distances, whether they’re in tall buildings, massive warehouses, or enormous lots. Work is usually autonomously performed outside of the sight of a direct manager. Site managers and administrators can use apps to issue critical weather or safety-related alerts, reducing the need to track down employees manually across construction zones. Issuing reminders Injuries can happen when employees get careless about safety requirements. For example, workers may be inclined to remove helmets, gloves, or goggles from time to time. A crew may head into a work zone without enough water during a heat wave. As such, safety reminders should be sent on an ongoing basis to avoid unnecessary lapses in protocol.  Managers can use apps to transmit digital reminders on a daily, weekly, or monthly basis. Managers can also embed digital signature requests to notifications, requiring workers to sign off on important safety checks. These workflows protect both the workers and the company. Improving transparency Site managers are typically responsible for overseeing many workers. It’s important to have a solid understanding of where workers are and what they are doing. However, tracking can be tricky when using non-digital management systems. Apps can be used to communicate team locations and project updates, allowing managers to see exactly where all of their workers are across different sites at any point. For example, a manager could use an app to receive a notification whenever someone from the team enters into a high-risk situation, such as working in a fall zone or transporting heavy or dangerous items. Sharing emergency information No matter how much precaution you take, accidents happen. At some point, something will go wrong and a manager will need to take action.  One challenge facing construction teams is tracking down emergency contacts — especially when working at a remote site away from computers or employee files. Mobile apps can help here, too, by serving as a database where employees can enter family or medical contacts and add notes related to health issues and allergies. Having easy access to this information can be very helpful when emergency action is needed. These are just a few ways that apps can be used to improve construction safety. AppSheet, for instance, offers a sample Safety Reporting App that teams can use to report and log accidents. Check out the construction safety reporting app here: AppSheet also allows you to build custom apps using your company’s data. To experience the power of agile no-code development, try AppSheet today for free.

The Modern Approach to EAM

Utilities, gas, construction, and manufacturing providers are increasingly using custom apps to streamline enterprise asset management (EAM). This makes digital EAM a top technology to watch in 2020 and beyond. Enterprise asset management challenges any large industrial provider. The average company can have hundreds of thousands of assets scattered across multiple locations. These assets include human resources, machines, vehicles, wide area networking components, servers, and more. And each system plays a vital role in the ongoing stability and profitability of the organization. Using software to manage EAM Traditionally, most of these systems and machines operated independently, making it difficult to achieve effective enterprise asset management (EAM) goals. Today, though, more and more industrial providers are moving digital transformation initiatives forward, implementing cutting-edge solutions to oversee the sum of their assets. There are hurdles to the digitization of EAM, however. Off-the-shelf EAM software is very expensive with costs often exceeding $11,000 per user. EAM can be a costly investment for the budget-conscious organization, especially when considering all of the additional technological expenses facing companies today (e.g., data management, the cloud, computers, communications, insurance, and more). It’s possible, however, to build your own EAM apps using a no-code app platform — saving your company thousands of dollars while building a solution that matches your precise needs. The no-code approach to EAM Using a no-code app platform like AppSheet, it’s possible to build individual apps for specific EAM processes. For example, you could build apps to track HR processes, workflows, data management, inventory, and more by merging these functions into a centralized reporting app. Here are some of the benefits that come with using no-code EAM apps. Agile asset tracking One of the problems with out-of-the-box EAM platforms is that they lack the ability to enable you to easily create and track new and custom assets.  By using a no-code EAM platform, however, a company can create specific apps on an as-needed basis. For example, a manufacturing company may decide to start tracking IoT solutions. This could be easily accomplished by taking data from Sheets or Excel and building an app to provide ongoing expense reports.  Fewer errors  Human error remains a major challenge with EAM solutions, which still require physical data entry. It’s very common for data to be entered incorrectly, resulting in inaccurate reporting and untrustworthy results.  No-code EAM eliminates manual data entry by creating a system where information can be entered via digital fields and intuitive drop-down menus. This removes the need to manually transcribe data — increasing data integrity and helping your business make smarter decisions.  If a data value is entered incorrectly on a no-code platform, it’s far easier to detect and correct the mistake. No-code apps offer greater data transparency than traditional paper-based data entry systems. Authorized users can access, review, and update data from any device. Cloud-based management  A study by Software Advice found that 86 percent of EAM buyers prefer a cloud-based EAM solution. This statistic highlights the need for streamlined back-end management and affordable storage. No-code app platforms like AppSheet leverage the cloud to deliver powerful, SaaS-based building functionality. It’s a far more cost-effective approach to running an on-premise EAM solution or hiring developers to build one from scratch for you.  Learn more about AppSheet’s no-code platform.

Four Concrete Ways Digitization is Transforming Construction

The construction industry is changing immensely through the adoption of digital technologies that provide solutions to tough problems at the job site and beyond. Construction companies are launching all kinds of digital transformation initiatives to automate workflows, connect construction sites and workers, provide better security and safety, and much more. In this post, we'll explore four tactics that are spurring technological change in the construction industry.  Construction management software With the advent of the cloud came an explosion in off-the-shelf construction programs that help professionals manage projects, finances, clients, and more. Today, most construction companies are using platforms like CoConstruct, Procore, RedTeam, and others to oversee daily operations. These solutions, however, typically lack flexibility and customization. No two construction companies are exactly alike. It’s unreasonable for a company to expect to find a program that can meet its exact needs. What’s more, these types of programs are also typically expensive to purchase and deploy. Beyond that, companies often get trapped and confined by the construction software that they use. It’s common to start using a program and become so reliant on it that you stop innovating and experimenting with other digital solutions. Out-of-box programs can pigeonhole a company into working a certain way. Teams will often shift the way they work to accommodate a new type of software — instead of utilizing software that matches the way they want to work. Biometric security sensors Another leading digital technology that we’re seeing in construction is biometrics, which is increasingly being used to help provide increased security for remote construction sites. Biometrics is a technical term that means body measurements and calculations. Basically, it’s using physical and behavioral characteristics to identify human beings. Construction sites are finding added security and protection through the use of biometric sensors such as fingerprint readers, as well as facial and voice recognition technology. “The construction sector has really woken up to the significant advancements that digital technology such as biometrics can offer them,” says Nick Wilkinson, head of human recognition systems at Workforce Management Solutions. “Not only does it help to improve site security and training compliance, it can provide management with a significant amount of useful data that can improve site efficiencies for future jobs. Biometrics was the first part of the jigsaw in the digital construction picture for many main contractors and will remain at its heart as the industry moves forward.” Internet of Things (IoT) In addition to software, we’re also seeing more connected devices coming to market in construction. Over the last decade, IoT has been steadily growing as more and more devices have become IP-enabled. As a result, construction sites have emerged as a leading IoT arena. For example, workers now wear a variety of sensors that collect and deliver data about their environment and performance. Sensors can be used to collect information related to air quality, body and surrounding temperature, location, heart rate, and other important factors. At the same time, companies are using IoT devices to track their fleets, streamline safety inspections for vehicles and machinery, assess construction quality, and anticipate project completion times.  Additionally, IoT devices make it possible to keep key stakeholders and customers informed with project updates. Using the IoT can also significantly boost the customer experience, leading to more projects and contracts in the long run. Software-defined wide area networking (SD-WAN) The rise of the IoT and the ultra-connected, modern construction site has increased the need for reliable remote connectivity. Downtime, after all, can lead to lapses in data, system monitoring, and communication — grinding operations to a halt until service is restored and delaying projects. Now, construction sites are starting to use software-defined wide area networking (SD-WAN) to establish virtual, fail-proof remote networks supported by link aggregation, centralized management functionality, and enhanced security. Conclusion The construction industry is barreling toward technological advancements to provide solutions to tough problems. We are already seeing plenty of different digital avenues that are changing the ways in which workers engage with the job site and beyond. Whether it be added security through the use of biometric sensor, the adoption of remote connectivity, utilizing software to streamline certain processes, and much more. Failing to hop on to the train now can lead to significant setbacks for your business. Best of all, adopting digital technologies doesn’t have to be daunting. And we promise that the hard work it takes to get the ball running will be worth it in the end.

How Mobile Apps Can Increase Your Construction Site Productivity

Finding ways to increase productivity at the work site is a major concern for many construction company owners. Often, there is a lack of standardization across construction teams; workers complete tasks differently, find shortcuts to get things down quicker, and record data often by hand. Adopting mobile apps is a great way to solve a lot of these problems while also offering powerful and flexible tools for workers to add to their tool-belt.  Many contractors are using (or building their own) apps for project management. One benefit of project management mobile apps is reducing the amount of paper needed on a job - especially drawings. Mobile apps are not only reducing the need for so much paperwork, but they also are centralizing your data. In the past, workers might need to fill out paperwork after visiting a site, and then deliver it, fax it, or scan it, when they get to the site office or back to their own. Using Mobile apps allows them to store and send data to everyone who needs it wherever there is a mobile signal. Many existing processes can be automated and provide important information for everyone involved on a construction project. Applications can be designed to track progress of projects to help save time and increase efficiency. Here are some ways mobile apps can help your construction company stay productive and agile in today’s fast-changing market: Better tracking of your job site Adopting a mobile infrastructure for your business doesn't just get rid of paper, it also allows you more flexibility and agility in tracking your workers' work and your assets whereabouts. Theft is a common problem on construction sites, particularly of valuable materials like tools, copper, and aluminum. Using radio-frequency identification (RFID) devices to track assets via mobile apps can help recover missing or stolen articles, while mobile surveillance can help reduce job site theft and increase employee productivity, especially at remote sites. In addition to the added protection over your job site, mobile tracking allows you to make smarter decisions when allocating resources between multiple sites and workers. Power to your payroll One of the biggest headaches of any business comes from tracking and recording of your workers' hours. Accountability can prove difficult when you're working systems that don't properly document the time in and out. Using mobile apps to file times sheets and process payroll can help boost efficiency, since workers can clock in on their mobile devices and report to work immediately on their mobile devices. Your apps can also give GPS tracking and bio-metric capabilities can also help reduce time fraud. And real-time information can be immediately processed via mobile apps, reducing response time and increasing efficiency. One example of this type of app is SurePayroll, which allows employees to access paychecks and other payroll details at their own convenience, and allows employers to access their payrolls even on the go. Whether it’s paying regular employees or independent contractors, employers can enter payroll, preview, and submit payroll at the touch of a button. Project Management and Collaboration Mobile apps can connect everyone involved on a construction project, from architects to engineers to project managers. Adopting these mobile technologies can help manage activities, employees, information, and processes associated with a given project and even control scheduling. Mobile apps allow project managers to download blueprints, sync information in real-time, and communicate with the job site even when they aren't on-site. One popular app for project management  is the Photo Measures App, which allows users to measure dimensions captured in photos. It has a user-friendly interface, and users can quickly record and save measurement on a frequent basis. Another app that helps reduce planning time and boost efficiency in construction projects is Plan Grid, which allows project managers to easily share plans, markups, photos, and reports with the entire project team from anywhere. PlanGrid can be used with or without an internet connection during construction to track revisions, document progress, and manage issues in the field while keeping everyone on the current set. Mobile Apps Reduce Constructions Costs The construction industry has been seriously challenged by rising costs and declining opportunities, placing increasing pressure on companies to make their processes more cost and time efficient.  According to Go Canvas, statistics show that 50 percent of a worker’s time while on the clock is devoted to wasteful activity caused by poor communication, inadequate management, or over-staffing. Meanwhile, construction companies are losing some $6.9 billion in inefficient processes among operations and maintenance staff, and $1.7 billion to outdated communications like paper forms. And large construction companies can waste some $3.5 million searching for information or recreating documents they couldn’t find. AppSheet can help you customize apps to boost your construction job site productivity and efficiency. Built with Google Sheets and AppSheet, the app automatically captures GPS locations, collections images, and allows customization of the collected data. Here are a couple sample apps that you can play around with to get started: Quote Calculator enables contractors to calculate payment owed based on services rendered, and is a useful tool to quickly and easily calculate costs of services. The app allows users to input numerical data in to the app, calculate and display the results, and save the entry for future recall. Repair Manual is a useful app for any business that needs to provide an instruction manual to employees or customers. This app has step-by-step instructions for repairing dry-wall, with helpful images that demonstrate each step clearly. Timesheet is an app easily tracks log times in and out to compute hours and calculate total wages, providing all necessary information for accounting or human resources departments. This app uses information capture via forms, app formulas, virtual columns, references, and image display. Let AppSheet help you raise the roof on your construction job site with custom mobile apps!  This post was updated on December 9th, 2019.

Tips for Inspiring Digital Change in Construction

  It's easy to get stuck in a "business as usual" routine, but the construction industry is seeing a lot of growth though through the adoption of innovative digital technology. Digital transformation, however, can take a bit quite a bit of work. That’s because digital transformation isn’t a typical IT purchase or upgrade but an ongoing process. With that in mind, here are some tips that you can use to inspire digital change in your construction company: Make it a team effort  At most companies, technology decisions are made by IT administrators and distributed across the company. Digital transformation, however, is much more comprehensive. It involves breaking down barriers between technical and non-technical workers. As such, close collaboration and communication is required for success. All department heads and managers should therefore be brought together to discuss digital transformation, identify needs and goals, determine project leaders, and form a game plan. Don’t attempt to go it alone when implementing digital transformation. If you do, you will almost certainly encounter push back from employees and department heads along the way. And the point of implementing these changes isn't just to make your business more efficient, but to also allow your workers more options and connectivity between each other. Focus on change — not outcomes Another reason why construction companies tend to struggle with digital transformation is because the process is fundamentally different than that of construction. In other words, construction projects always come to an end with a finished structure. Digital transformation, however, is a process that is never complete.  That might sound like a downside, but it's actually a benefit! The end goal is not a finished product but rather a state of agility where the company is constantly collecting data, analyzing its processes, and looking for better ways of doing business. With digital transformation, you have to have a growth mindset. Not everything is going to be perfect, but that just means you can be flexible in how you deal with problems. Target small wins The phrase digital transformation always sound great around a boardroom table. But beyond that, the term can be vague and confusing. Digital transformation projects can drag on for months or years with limited results simply due to a lack of cohesion — and a lack of action. For this reason, administrators are encouraged to start small with digital transformation. Set up “lighthouse” projects and assign teams to explore various departments, identify challenges, and experiment with digital projects. Here is an example of what this might look like: A lighthouse team could meet with a site manager and ask for a complete rundown of how the department operates. Then, once the team has a clear understanding of every process and individual involved in the unit, they can drill down into potential areas of waste or inefficiency and identify possible ways of automating the process. The key thing to remember is that implementing digital transformation into your company, while incredibly value, is not a quick process and you must take your time going through the proper steps to make your efforts worth the investment.  

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